"It’s funny to compare the three albums because even though I was a part of the creative process for all three, in some ways when I look back to the first album, that time seems so distant to me. It’s hard for me to fully remember how things felt.
"To me, it feels very natural. I kind of feel like we’re doing the same thing that we’ve always done. Some things change, but it’s like we were talking about before, in the early days, when I pictured my memories of whatever, working on songs and writing with Rostam, I picture us being 18, in his dorm room, sitting in front of his computer, making some sort of demo of the song, ‘Bryn.’
"Then I picture the apartment he and C.T. had in Greenpoint right when they graduated and me taking the bus up from Bed-Stuy, and us working on ‘Oxford Comma’ or ‘A Punk,’ and hearing some of the flute parts for the first time.
"And then, you know, I picture this album. It’s kind of like sitting in his apartment where he lives now and playing me some stuff on piano, us talking about it. So, some things change, of course, but it does kind of all boil down to the same basic idea of this collaborative project of writing and recording songs.
"So, of course, every album hopefully is reflective of the time period in which it was made. I’d like to think that I’ve changed a little bit and hopefully learned something since I graduated from college, and probably everybody changes a little bit, but then there’s some part of me that just doesn’t believe that, does kind of feel like (laughs) nobody changes, everybody’s the same.
"And I guess it’s for other people to look at the three albums and kind of see the way that they … I can step back and try to come up with some decent explanations of the way that each album changed and expanded our universe, but you have to be so immersed in the album that you’re making.
"So yeah, I don’t know, it’s a hard question to answer. I’d like to think that when all is said and done and people look back on the records that we’ve made, everyone will feel equally Vampire Weekend — I don’t know what the adjective is, ‘Vampire Weekend-y’? (laughs) But each one will be kind of evocative of a different time period. I think that’s the best that you can hope for as a band."

Read: CBS News’ web extra interview: Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig

"It’s funny to compare the three albums because even though I was a part of the creative process for all three, in some ways when I look back to the first album, that time seems so distant to me. It’s hard for me to fully remember how things felt.

"To me, it feels very natural. I kind of feel like we’re doing the same thing that we’ve always done. Some things change, but it’s like we were talking about before, in the early days, when I pictured my memories of whatever, working on songs and writing with Rostam, I picture us being 18, in his dorm room, sitting in front of his computer, making some sort of demo of the song, ‘Bryn.’

"Then I picture the apartment he and C.T. had in Greenpoint right when they graduated and me taking the bus up from Bed-Stuy, and us working on ‘Oxford Comma’ or ‘A Punk,’ and hearing some of the flute parts for the first time.

"And then, you know, I picture this album. It’s kind of like sitting in his apartment where he lives now and playing me some stuff on piano, us talking about it. So, some things change, of course, but it does kind of all boil down to the same basic idea of this collaborative project of writing and recording songs.

"So, of course, every album hopefully is reflective of the time period in which it was made. I’d like to think that I’ve changed a little bit and hopefully learned something since I graduated from college, and probably everybody changes a little bit, but then there’s some part of me that just doesn’t believe that, does kind of feel like (laughs) nobody changes, everybody’s the same.

"And I guess it’s for other people to look at the three albums and kind of see the way that they … I can step back and try to come up with some decent explanations of the way that each album changed and expanded our universe, but you have to be so immersed in the album that you’re making.

"So yeah, I don’t know, it’s a hard question to answer. I’d like to think that when all is said and done and people look back on the records that we’ve made, everyone will feel equally Vampire Weekend — I don’t know what the adjective is, ‘Vampire Weekend-y’? (laughs) But each one will be kind of evocative of a different time period. I think that’s the best that you can hope for as a band."

Read: CBS News’ web extra interview: Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig

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